CBO

classictrek:

Nichelle Nichols talks to a group of students at NASA Mission Control in 1977 and visits the Lewis Research center that same year.

In the mid-1970s, Nichols has given a speech that criticized NASA for not selecting women and people of color as astronaut candidates. The agency’s response was to hire her to find and recruit talented minorities and women, and she did exactly that. In her tenure as a recruiter, she helped the agency bring five women, three African American men and an Asian American male on board.

And she is a very gracious and sweet lady…I spoke with her at DragonCon!!!

(via scinerds)

todiwan:

What you’re currently looking at is the “Destiny” module on the international space station. It serves as a permanent orbital research station for US orbital research. It has been in operation since February, 2001.
This beautiful piece of engineering is around 8.5 metres long, around 4.3 metres in diameters and weighs about 14500kg. The thing about space is that there is no up and down. When you look at the pictures, things are all over the place. There is no ceiling or wall to speak of. Due to the sheer amount of thrust needed to lift even a tiny amount of mass into orbit, space must be preserved.

This is an image of the Destiny module just after installation. When the module arrived to the ISS, it contained only a few “racks” with electronics. The rest of the racks were empty. On each side of the laboratory module, there was room for 6 racks, for a total of 24. After installation, more racks were flown to the module in future missions.
Astronaut Kenneth Cockrell peeking out of an empty rack. There’s time for fun photos even in the hectic, yet wonderful, work-filled life of an astronaut.
Nowadays, Destiny looks much different:


Some of the experiments that Destiny contains are “Minus Eighty Degree Laboratory Freezer for ISS” (MELFI), used to store, as well as transport reagents to and from the space station, and the AgCam (Agricultural Camera) - an incredible student project of students at the University of North Dakota - which takes multi-spectral images of vegetated areas of the Earth for agricultural research and optimal cultivation. AgCam is currently installed on the main observation window of the module, pictured below.

todiwan:

What you’re currently looking at is the “Destiny” module on the international space station. It serves as a permanent orbital research station for US orbital research. It has been in operation since February, 2001.

This beautiful piece of engineering is around 8.5 metres long, around 4.3 metres in diameters and weighs about 14500kg. The thing about space is that there is no up and down. When you look at the pictures, things are all over the place. There is no ceiling or wall to speak of. Due to the sheer amount of thrust needed to lift even a tiny amount of mass into orbit, space must be preserved.

This is an image of the Destiny module just after installation. When the module arrived to the ISS, it contained only a few “racks” with electronics. The rest of the racks were empty. On each side of the laboratory module, there was room for 6 racks, for a total of 24. After installation, more racks were flown to the module in future missions.

Astronaut Kenneth Cockrell peeking out of an empty rack. There’s time for fun photos even in the hectic, yet wonderful, work-filled life of an astronaut.

Nowadays, Destiny looks much different:

Some of the experiments that Destiny contains are “Minus Eighty Degree Laboratory Freezer for ISS” (MELFI), used to store, as well as transport reagents to and from the space station, and the AgCam (Agricultural Camera) - an incredible student project of students at the University of North Dakota - which takes multi-spectral images of vegetated areas of the Earth for agricultural research and optimal cultivation. AgCam is currently installed on the main observation window of the module, pictured below.

(via climate-changing)

theexplicitone:

Tardigrades: Extremeophile -Badasses. 

When their environment becomes to inhospitable they “die” or enter a dormant state known as cryptobiosis and once their environment becomes more suitable they can revive.  Live tardigrades have been regenerated from dried-up mosses after more than 100 years of being in their dormant state.

Tardigrades can withstand; up to 10 years of dehydration, temperatures of absolute zero or up to 300 degrees Fahrenheit, radiation over 1000 times that which would kill an elephant, pressures over 6 times that found in the deepest oceans on earth oh….and outer space. 

When NASA scientist sent tardigrades into low earth orbit and then exposed them to the vacuum of space and massive amounts of UV radiation the tardigrades were able to revive and were healthy and even produced perfectly healthy offspring.   Tardigrades are believed to support the Panspermia Hypothesis

The coolest creature evair…

(via scinerds)

mothernaturenetwork:

Satellite photos show Amazon vanishingClear-cutting for roads and agriculture has transformed the Amazon rain forest in western Brazil, as a new set of satellite images from NASA illustrates.

mothernaturenetwork:

Satellite photos show Amazon vanishing
Clear-cutting for roads and agriculture has transformed the Amazon rain forest in western Brazil, as a new set of satellite images from NASA illustrates.

ikenbot:

Less Than a Week Remains Before NASA’s Biggest Rover Yet Lands on Mars
NASA’s newest Mars rover is less than a week away from its high-stakes landing on the surface of the Red Planet.
The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover is scheduled to touch down on Mars at 10:30 p.m. PDT on Aug. 5 (1:30 a.m. Aug. 6 EDT, 0530 GMT). The car-size robotic explorer is designed to investigate whether Mars is, or ever was, capable of hosting microbial life.
With six days to go until Curiosity arrives at the Red Planet, project managers are bracing themselves for what NASA calls the riskiest part of the mission: the rover’s harrowing descent through the Martian atmosphere to the ground.
Full Article

ikenbot:

Less Than a Week Remains Before NASA’s Biggest Rover Yet Lands on Mars

NASA’s newest Mars rover is less than a week away from its high-stakes landing on the surface of the Red Planet.

The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover is scheduled to touch down on Mars at 10:30 p.m. PDT on Aug. 5 (1:30 a.m. Aug. 6 EDT, 0530 GMT). The car-size robotic explorer is designed to investigate whether Mars is, or ever was, capable of hosting microbial life.

With six days to go until Curiosity arrives at the Red Planet, project managers are bracing themselves for what NASA calls the riskiest part of the mission: the rover’s harrowing descent through the Martian atmosphere to the ground.

Full Article

(Source: afro-dominicano)

ikenbot:

Huge Mars Rover One Month from Red Planet Landing
Image: This artist’s concept depicts a sky crane lowering NASA’s Curiosity rover onto the Martian surface. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
The biggest rover ever launched to another planet is just one month away from its target: the Red Planet, Mars.
NASA’s huge Curiosity rover is hurtling toward a planned late-night landing on Mars on Aug. 5 PDT (early Aug. 6 EDT), and the anticipation on the science team is high. The reasons are clear: At 1 ton, Curiosity is the largest rover ever aimed at Mars. It will land in a completely new way, using a giant parachute and a rocket-powered sky crane. And it is carrying a sophisticated set of tools to find out if its Martian drop zone could once have been home for life.
But that’s all in the future. First Curiosity has to reach Mars in one piece.
Full Article

ikenbot:

Huge Mars Rover One Month from Red Planet Landing

Image: This artist’s concept depicts a sky crane lowering NASA’s Curiosity rover onto the Martian surface. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

The biggest rover ever launched to another planet is just one month away from its target: the Red Planet, Mars.

NASA’s huge Curiosity rover is hurtling toward a planned late-night landing on Mars on Aug. 5 PDT (early Aug. 6 EDT), and the anticipation on the science team is high. The reasons are clear: At 1 ton, Curiosity is the largest rover ever aimed at Mars. It will land in a completely new way, using a giant parachute and a rocket-powered sky crane. And it is carrying a sophisticated set of tools to find out if its Martian drop zone could once have been home for life.

But that’s all in the future. First Curiosity has to reach Mars in one piece.

Full Article

(Source: afro-dominicano)

mothernaturenetwork:

NASA’s intelligent design case goes to courtOpening statements began on March 12 in the case of a NASA computer specialist who alleges that he was fired from his job at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory because of his belief in intelligent design.

mothernaturenetwork:

NASA’s intelligent design case goes to court
Opening statements began on March 12 in the case of a NASA computer specialist who alleges that he was fired from his job at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory because of his belief in intelligent design.

expose-the-light:

10 Moons Every Person Should Know

Pretty much everyone can rattle off the names of our solar system’s eight (formerly nine) planets, but ask the average person to list some moons and you’ll be lucky if they can tell you more than two or three.

Now, you obviously can’t expect people to remember the name of every single satellite in the solar system (after all, they outnumber the planets by around 20 to 1), but if you have even the slightest interest in astronomy, it wouldn’t kill you to be familiar with at least an even ten. So with that in mind, we’ve assembled this reference guide to ten of the solar system’s most noteworthy moons.

1. Moon: Europa
Parent Planet: Jupiter
Why You Should Know it: Despite being covered by distinctive, criss-crossing cracks and ridges, Europa’s water-ice surface is largely free of craters, making it perhaps the smoothest solid body in the entire solar system. More interesting than Europa’s frozen exterior, however, is what lies hidden beneath it.

2. Moon: Io
Parent Planet: Jupiter
Why You Should Know it: Io is very close in size to our own moon, but it couldn’t be more different. Despite having a mean surface temperature of less than -250 degrees Fahrenheit, Io is home to over 400 raging volcanos, making it the single most geologically active object in the solar system.

3. Moon: Mimas
Parent Planet: Saturn
Why you should know it: This list is an important reference for any self-respecting science geek, but Mimas is especially relevant for fans of science fiction for what should be obvious reasons. In brief: Mimas is no space station. It’s a moon. Like many of Saturn’s orbiting bodies, Mimas is small and icy, but it’s also home to “Herschel” — the name astronomers have given the massive crater situated on the moon’s leading hemisphere.

4. Moon: Enceladus
Parent Planet: Saturn
Why You Should Know it: Enceladus is one wacky little moon. Like Europa, its surface is covered in water ice, but it’s also home to some of the most impressive geysers in the solar system. Scientists had suspected for years that Enceladus was venting water vapor from its surface, but it wasn’t until 2005 that they had direct visual confirmation that the moon was doing so by spewing jets of the stuff from geysers on its surface.

5. Moon: Triton
Parent Planet: Neptune
Why You Should Know it: Of all the biggest, “major” moons in the solar system, Triton is the only one that orbits in a direction opposite that of its parent planet’s rotation. Astrophysicists call this a “retrograde orbit,” and it’s typical of moons that have been “captured” by their parent planet.

6. Moon: Iapetus
Parent Planet: Saturn
Why You Should Know it: Iapetus may be one of the most mysterious moons we’ve ever discovered. For one thing, it is two completely different colors; the moon’s trailing hemisphere is as bright and reflective as snow, but its leading hemisphere is as dark as freshly poured asphalt — a characteristic that has led many astronomers to refer to it as the “painted” or “yin-yang” moon.

7. Moon: Phobos
Parent Planet: Mars
Why You Should Know it: Mars’ moon Phobos may not be the biggest moon on this list. It may not have the most interesting geology, or the most peculiar orbit, or the most promising environment when it comes to harboring extraterrestrial life. Be that as it may, there is a very, very good chance that it will become the second moon — and the third cosmic body — to host human travelers on mankind’s journey out into the Universe.

8. Moon: Titan
Parent Planet: Saturn
Why You Should Know it: If moons could be considered for reclassification under planetary status, Titan would be the first to come under review. It is the only moon in the entire solar system with a dense atmosphere (which can be clearly seen in the form of an enveloping haze in many recent Cassini images, including the one featured here); it experiences rain and snow; and it’s even home to geological features like lakes, valleys, plains and deserts. In fact, according to NASA’s Dr. Rosaly Lopes, “Titan looks more like the Earth than any other body in the Solar System.”

9. Moon: Hyperion
Parent Planet: Saturn
Why You Should Know it: Phil Plait — astronomer extraordinair and master of ceremonies over at Bad Astronomy — once called Hyperion “the solar system’s weirdest moon” — and that’s saying something. For one thing, Saturn is home to some pretty wonky moons (just look at how many of the natural satellites on this list orbit the ringed planet); secondly, Phil Plait has written about some weird moons in his day — so what makes Hyperion the weirdest? Well, a lot of things, but for starters: the loofah-like moon happens to be weirdly foamy.

10. Moon: Moon
Parent Planet: Earth
Why You Should Know it: It’s hard to go wrong with the original. Sure, it’s the first moon humans ever observed, but it wasn’t until the 1950s that we finally managed to get a glimpse of its far side; and just last week we learned that the Moon may have been partly responsible for sinking the Titanic, demonstrating that our Moon has been — and will always be — a source of wonder and mystery. [Photo, and top photo, by Rick Baldridge via NASA]

(via scinerds)

mothernaturenetwork:

NASA unveils new online radio stationInternet radio station will feature songs and artists from across the decades along with NASA features and news items.

 Way cool!

mothernaturenetwork:

NASA unveils new online radio station
Internet radio station will feature songs and artists from across the decades along with NASA features and news items.

 Way cool!

(via jtotheizzoe)

NASA’s Kepler Mission Confirms Its First Planet in Habitable Zone of Sun-like Star

NASA’s Kepler Mission Confirms Its First Planet in Habitable Zone of Sun-like Star

jtotheizzoe:


NASA Satellite Spots New Behemoth Sunspot
NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory has spotted one of the largest new sunspots to appear on the surface of the sun in years. It is nearly 25,000 miles wide, or more than three times larger than the Earth. The enormous sunspot was seen rotating over the sun’s northeastern limb on Nov. 3.

A little hydrogen fusion concealer and some galactic radiation powder will cover that spot right up. Don’t be self-conscious, Sun.

jtotheizzoe:

NASA Satellite Spots New Behemoth Sunspot

NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory has spotted one of the largest new sunspots to appear on the surface of the sun in years. It is nearly 25,000 miles wide, or more than three times larger than the Earth. The enormous sunspot was seen rotating over the sun’s northeastern limb on Nov. 3.

A little hydrogen fusion concealer and some galactic radiation powder will cover that spot right up. Don’t be self-conscious, Sun.

(via jtotheizzoe)

cwnl:

A Flying Astronaut Over Earth
What would it be like to fly free over the seas and clouds of Earth? In 1994 astronaut Mark Lee found out when he tested the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system for NASA. SAFER is a backpack propulsion unit that incorporates small nitrogen thrusters controlled by hand and moderated by computer. Pictured, Lee jets about the bay of Space Shuttle Discovery, over 200 kilometers above Earth in the first untethered space walk in ten years.
Credit: Shuttle Crew STS-64, NASA

cwnl:

A Flying Astronaut Over Earth

What would it be like to fly free over the seas and clouds of Earth? In 1994 astronaut Mark Lee found out when he tested the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) system for NASA. SAFER is a backpack propulsion unit that incorporates small nitrogen thrusters controlled by hand and moderated by computer. Pictured, Lee jets about the bay of Space Shuttle Discovery, over 200 kilometers above Earth in the first untethered space walk in ten years.

Credit: Shuttle Crew STS-64, NASA

(Source: afro-dominicano)